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Master of Science in Financial Crime and Compliance Management: Career Outlook

Combating economic threats and adhering to regulatory requirements.

In the wake of major economic scandals like Enron, Bernie Madoff, and the subprime mortgage implosion, the public demanded stronger business and financial oversight. To meet the demand, jobs in this developing field now require people who are up-to-date in cyberterrorism prevention to identify theft avoidance and conduct tax crime and credit card investigations. You’ll complete this program with the skills you need to manage corporate and advanced technological resources and combat financial crime.

Job growth is either steady or increasing, with Recruiter.com reporting that “vacancies for this career have increased by 29.04 percent nationwide (since 2004)” and “demand for Risk Management Specialists is expected to go up, with an expected 11,760 new jobs filled by 2018.”4 Our Master of Science in Financial Crime and Compliance Management prepares you to tap into these opportunities and advance your career.

Graduate qualified for leadership positions in fraud analysis, fraud investigation, fraud examination, and compliance in many industries and law enforcement organizations.

DIRECTOR, ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT

$132,063/year

Enterprise risk managers work with companies to assess and identify the potential risks that may hinder the reputation, safety, security, and financial prosperity of their organization.5,6,7

FRAUD INVESTIGATOR

$64,690/year

Gather and analyze evidence, conduct interviews and interrogations, and build a case to identify and bring responsible parties to justice.7,8

MANAGER, RISK & COMPLIANCE

$90,000/year

The role of a compliance officer, sometimes called a compliance manager, is to make sure that a company is conducting its business in full compliance with all national and international laws and regulations that pertain to its particular industry, as well as professional standards, accepted business practices, and internal standards.9,10

Additional roles for financial crime experts:

  • Lawyer ($119,250/year)11
  • Officer with Anti-Money Laundering ($67,599/year)12
  • Senior Fraud Analyst ($52,752/year)13

Certification: Lead Investigations in Cryptocurrency Fraud and Theft

Through a unique partnership with CipherTrace — a leading cryptocurrency intelligence company — you can become a CipherTrace Certified Examiner (CTCE) and learn how to analyze and trace funds lost in cryptocurrency fraud and theft. You’ll use the same tools and get the same CTCE training as regulators and law enforcement members around the world do in becoming expert cryptocurrency financial investigators.

Once certified, you’ll be able to complete an active investigation at CipherTrace and write the case report, giving you direct, hands-on experience and demonstrating an incredibly valuable skill set to employers.

Request More Information

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Key Skills Employers Need

Beyond the Degree

We have the tools to help you make your next career move:

One-on-One Mentors

Work with your program director and professors for professional mentorship and support.

Job Search Assistance

Build your résumé, do mock interviews, and find new opportunities in your area.

Career Counseling

Have our experts review your résumé and LinkedIn and learn to stand out from the crowd.

Handshake

Register for events, create a visual profile for employers, and apply for jobs and internships through our online portal.

Sources

  1. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2018, April 13). Financial Examiners. Retrieved on December 29, 2018, from https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/financial-examiners.htm#tab-1
  2. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2018, April 13). Financial Managers. Retrieved on December 23, 2018, from https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/financial-managers.htm
  3. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2018, April 13). Financial Examiners. Retrieved on December 29, 2018, from https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/financial-examiners.htm#tab-5
  4. Recruiter. (n.d.). Career Outlook and Job Vacancies for Risk Management Specialists. Retrieved January 2, 2019, from https://www.recruiter.com/careers/risk-management-specialists/outlook/
  5. Salary.com. (n.d.) Salary for Risk Management Director. Retrieved on November 1, 2018, from, https://www.salary.com/research/salary/benchmark/risk-management-director-salary
  6. All About Careers. (n.d.). Risk Manager. Retrieved January 2, 2019, from https://www.allaboutcareers.com/job-profile/risk-manager
  7. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2018, April 13). Claims Adjusters, Appraisers, Examiners, and Investigators. Retrieved January 2, 2019, from https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/claims-adjusters-appraisers-examiners-and-investigators.htm
  8. PayScale. (n.d.). Average Fraud Investigator Salary. Retrieved January 2, 2019, from https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Fraud_Investigator/Salary
  9. PayScale. (n.d.). Average Compliance Risk Manager Salary. Retrieved January 2, 2019, from https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Compliance_Risk_Manager/Salary
  10. Robert Walters USA. (n.d.). The role of a compliance officer. Retrieved January 2, 2019, from https://www.robertwalters.us/blog/the-role-of-a-compliance-officer.html
  11. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2018, April 13). Lawyers. Retrieved January 2, 2019, from https://www.bls.gov/ooh/legal/lawyers.htm
  12. PayScale. (n.d.). Compliance Officer with Anti-Money Laundering (AML) Skills Salary. Retrieved January 2, 2019, from https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Compliance_Officer/Salary/86503f63/Anti-Money-Laundering-AML
  13. Glassdoor. (n.d.). Salary: Senior Fraud Analyst. Retrieved January 2, 2019, from https://www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/senior-fraud-analyst-salary-SRCH_KO0,20.htm